‘You’re not going to get me’: A woman’s plea for help in Melbourne hospital

Updated April 08, 2018 12:11:13 When Melbourne-based social worker Emma Henson arrived at the Sunshine Coast’s Sunshine Hospital, she was not expecting to meet a young woman who was already a fixture on the hospital’s waiting list.

“I was really nervous and nervous about going into that room and seeing this woman,” she said.

I was really grateful.” “

But then she turned to me and said, ‘It’s OK, I’ll be fine’.

I was really grateful.”

Ms Henson, from Melbourne’s inner-Melbourne suburb of Sunshine, said she had not seen Ms Williams before but she was quick to offer her support.

“There’s no one that I know that’s come to the hospital and said to me, ‘I’m not going in’,” she said, adding that she had talked to the woman’s family, who are also waiting to see if they can receive her.

Ms Williams said she would not have the time to travel to Melbourne or New South Wales for a visit. “

It’s a good thing that she’s here, but I just need to do my bit.”

Ms Williams said she would not have the time to travel to Melbourne or New South Wales for a visit.

“The most important thing for me is that I get to see the patients I care about,” she told ABC News.

“We need to make sure that people who need to be in hospitals get the care they need.”

I don’t want to be a nurse and a hospital nurse and just put on a pair of gloves and walk into the room and let people die.

“Now we have four or five. “

When I came in here, we didn’t have anyone who was on the waiting list,” she explained.

“Now we have four or five.

I would hope that we could do that more often.”

‘I need to talk to someone’ Ms Williams’ family have not contacted her for help, but Ms Henington said they were hopeful they could.

“They need to get a phone call from the hospital because I need to go to them and talk to them,” she recalled.

“I need the word to go out to the rest of the people who might be waiting for help.”

A few weeks ago, Ms Williams was diagnosed with the deadly coronavirus.

Ms Heningston said the woman, who was treated at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, had told her that she was “hoping to be able to come back to work”.

“She was very calm and collected and had no ill intentions, and she told me that she’d seen me on Facebook and that she loved me,” Ms Hensen said.

However, after Ms Williams returned to work, her health deteriorated.

She is currently in a coma and Ms Herington is hopeful that she will be able see her again.

It’s not just nurses Ms Hentingons worries about other staff members, especially those in charge of treating patients.

One of the most stressful aspects of caring for a patient with a terminal illness is having to explain the procedure and what patients are going through, Ms Hnington said.

“You’ve got to talk about things like what the patient is going through and what they’re experiencing,” she added.

The staff I’ve had to deal with in the past, they’ve been very caring, but they’re not prepared for this. “

If someone is suffering, I have to do the same thing.

The staff I’ve had to deal with in the past, they’ve been very caring, but they’re not prepared for this.

I’m just hoping that they can be prepared for whatever is happening.”

The Sunshine Hospital is a leading provider of hospice care for people in the Northern Territory and Victoria.

Dr Matthew Bannister, the hospital director, said there was a lack of awareness of what was happening with the virus in the community.

“(It) is a complex situation for our patients, and it has been a very challenging and stressful time for them,” he said.